Software Engineer, Consultant, Speaker & Technical Trainer

Category: Computer science (Page 1 of 4)

My thoughts on Java Concurrency in Practice

One of my key goals this year was to gain a good understanding of concurrency and multithreading. I’ve always had a tangent understanding of it at best. The book Java Concurrency in Practice was one of my first picks.

Sure, I’ve used multithreading concepts like promises & ajax in JavaScript before. I’ve also spawned go routines & used mutexes in Go. But I’ve never felt I’m proficient enough to state that I have a good understanding of this subject.

Hence, to bridge this gap in knowledge & skills, I decided to invest in several concurrency related books & courses. My intention was to start from JCIP and then move on to some additional courses. Initially, I felt that just reading this book won’t be sufficient to understand the subject thoroughly.

However, after going through this book I didn’t bother looking into any other concurrency course at all. It is one of the most succinct and yet thorough books on a given topic that I’ve ever read.

Additionally, I would recommend you to go through this book even if you’re not using Java at all. It will give you a very profound understanding of whatever framework/mechanism your language of choice uses to tackle concurrency.

Here’s why…

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Eliminate the undocumented TODOs with todocheck

Yesterday, I released todocheck – a new kind of static code analyser for annotated TODOs.

Way too often, we let leftover TODOs slip into our main branch, which leaves your coworkers puzzles, looking at it a year from now.

They’re thinking – what did I mean by “TODO: Move this to the users package”? What is the users package? It doesn’t seem to exist anymore.

todocheck helps you fix this by forcing you to mark all your TODOs against an existing, open issue in your issue tracker.

That way, if you, at some point, close the issue, thinking you’re done, the CI pipeline will sparkle in red as there is an open, unaddressed TODO in your main branch.

No longer can developers close a half-baked issue, rushing for the weekly sprint review to say “I’m done!”.

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How can vim make you a better developer

The first time I encountered vim was during a Linux System Administrator course I attended a while ago.

Didn’t really know much about Linux back then. It just sounded quite fancy.

During the course, the lecturer often typed in that 3 word command vim and edited some stuff.

“Gee, that looks cool”, I thought!

So, determined to look cool myself, I got back home, opened a terminal, typed in the magic words and voila! – I was inside vim.

So, with a great wish to write my first Hello World txt file in vim, I started hitting keys on my keyboard. And nothing was happening.

Some strange beeps started coming out of nowhere and I felt utterly frustrated!

So, my goal quickly shifted from typing anything, to exiting vim. Yeah, you probably know what follows.

A key-hitting berserk got me while doing everything I can to exit vim. Finally, after failing my first clash with the editor, I was so thankful to have the X key at the top right of my terminal emulator.

Now, this story should sound pretty familiar if you ever tried using vim. Well, eventually you learn how to exit it, and you learn how to type in symbols.

But there is so much more to it. The endless sets of key-combos can leave you wondering what the heck you did after accidentally hitting a key.

Nowadays, vim is the most popular text editor out there. Even some Windows users tend to use it although being an indigenous Unix utility.

But what’s the point? There are so many IDEs out there. Why would anyone bother poisoning his life with an endless vim frustration, when he can just install the first Javascript IDE google suggests.

Well, although it is probably not suitable for any project, there are some great benefits in sticking with vim at least for a while.

The greatest one being the user interface. However, the focus of this article is not that. Many articles can be found on the subject and perhaps I will make one in the future.

Today, we will explore the much less highlighted merits of the vim editor.

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The ultimate challenge for aspiring developers

When I first started programming, I started creating some simple console applications following some course materials. I had to create some simple algorithmic-type programs such as implementing factorial, Fibonacci, etc. Although creating these programs might be fun at first, it’s not like creating your own project from scratch.

Shortly after that, though, I created my very own game. That was simply amazing! I never thought that you can create some of the most popular arcade games with so little knowledge. That’s what hooked me up for programming. It was the step that made me look at programming not simply as a vocation, but a calling.

But I realize that I was lucky to find someone from whom to learn how to make my own game and do it myself afterwards. Most of the newbie programmers don’t have this experience and I think that is a shame.

Today, I want to recreate this journey for you and help you create your own game.

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Languages High and Low


This article is part of the sequence The Basics You Won’t Learn in the Basics aimed at eager people striving to gain a deeper understanding of programming and computer science.

When I started programming, I got introduced to C# and I thought it was pretty fun. As I advanced in my studies, I learned other programming languages as well. I learned JavaScript, PHP, Java.

Even though I learned to code in these languages, what I didn’t understand is why are there so many languages? What purpose did they all serve? Furthermore, I was curious where did all these languages came from? How did they come to be? What is a low-level language and why does it still exist?

The goal of this article is to try and help you find the answers for some of these questions and to further fire up your curiosity in the nature of programming languages and computers. I will walk you through the evolution of modern programming languages. Why did they come to be and what problem did they solve.

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