Preslav Mihaylov

Speaker, Software Engineer, Technical Trainer. Passionate about computer science, presentations and reading books

Tag: terminal

Automate Your Initial OS Setup

There was a time in my life when a huge part of my time was spent reinstalling my Linux OS. Wonder why?

Well, the first time you install Linux, they warn you to never run rm- rf / as this would delete your entire system. Fair enough, that’s simple to follow.

What they don’t tell you is that you have another million ways to effectively do the same thing with commands which seem harmless at first glance.

However, there were some benefit form my misfortunes.

What irritated me the most was installing all the software I use from scratch every single time. I often forgot to install one or two programs I use and had to do it on the fly once I actually needed them which was very disturbing.

Hence, I came up with the idea to create a script which would automate this process via a single command. Every time I reinstall my OS, I simply run the script, go get myself a coffee and once I’m back, I have my OS all setup with what I need.

If you’re in a situation where you often have to do this yourself, read on.

Also, be aware that this guide is specific to installing Linux and Mac OS. You could probably apply the same concept in Windows, but I only speak bash, not bat.

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tmux – A Terminal Multiplexer

Last time, I wrote about why I think everyone should try using a bare bones text editor like vim at least for a while.

After such an experience, some might give up on it, while others might want to switch to vim full-time.

For the latter – congratulations!

But inevitably, a problem will occur with this approach, especially if you are working on a big project – using bare bones vim for big projects is quite unproductive compared to IDEs.

I used to use vim on my hobby side projects and it did a great job, but once I tried using it on a project with a large code base and several different build variants, things started to get messy and I preferred using the IDE.

Some of you might disagree with me, I have seen people prefer sticking solely to bare bones vim.

But in my experience, apart from the text editing boost it gives you due to its awesome user interface, all the auxiliary tools you need to maintain a big project are invaluable and not easily available from a bare bones vim.

So, determined to amend that, I started exploring many different tools and plugins to enable my vim to challenge the productivity my IDE provides.

In this new series of articles, I will share my favorite tools which help me keep myself productive everyday by using vim.

In the first one, the topic is my all-time favorite vim add-on – tmux.


This article is part of the sequence  Boost Your VIM where I share my favorite vim plugins and tools which can greatly optimize your productivity and make you a better keystroke ninja.

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